Overview

  • Title : Global HR Forum 2015
  • Theme : Diverse Talent, Changing Societies
  • Date : November 4(Wed)~5(Thu), 2015
  • Venue : Grand InterContinental Seoul Parnas, Seoul, Korea

Program

  • Nov. 4(Wed)
  • Nov. 5(Thu)
Time Program
07:00~08:30 Registration
08:30~09:00

Opening Ceremony

Opening Speech
Kiwoong Kim President and Publisher, The Korea Economic Daily
Congratulatory Speech
Geun-hye Park President, Republic of Korea (Message)
Kyo-ahn Hwang Prime Minister, Republic of Korea
09:00~10:30

Keynote Speech

Changing Society, Changing EducationDetail

Speaker
Goh Chok Tong Emeritus Senior Minister, Republic of Singapore
Interlocutor
Yeoncheon Oh President, University of Ulsan

The Leadership Crisis: Fixing the BS of LeadershipDetail

Speaker
Jeffrey Pfeffer Professor of Organizational Behavior, Stanford University
10:30~11:00 Break
11:00~12:30

Plenary Session 1

Breaking Through Limitations: Strategies of Global CompaniesDetail

Moderator
Sungchull Junn CEO, Institute of Global Management
Speakers
Peter Zec Founder & CEO, Red Dot Design Award
Christine Pambianchi Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Corning Inc.
Umran Beba Senior Vice President & Chief HR Officer, PepsiCo AMENA Sector

Special Session 1

The 21st Century Skillset: What You Need to SucceedDetail

Moderator Sungmo Steve Kang President, KAIST
Speaker
Jake Schwartz CEO & Co-Founder, General Assembly

Managing Innovation in ChinaDetail

Speaker
George Yip Professor of Strategy & Co-Director, Centre on China Innovation, China Europe International Business School
12:30~14:00 Luncheon
14:00~15:30

Plenary Session 2

Student Mobility and the Internationalization of Higher EducationDetail

Moderator
Guwuck Bu Chairman, Korean Council for University Education
Speakers
John Sexton President, New York University
Michael Arthur President & Provost, University College London
Steven D. Lavine President, California Institute of the Arts

Special Session 2

Moderator
Wonsik Choi Country Head & Senior Partner, McKinsey & Company

Building High Performance Organizations and CulturesDetail

Speaker
Jeffrey Pfeffer Professor of Organizational Behavior, Stanford University

Creating Inclusive Workplaces: A Future Growth Engine for BusinessesDetail

Speaker
Deborah Gillis President & CEO, Catalyst
15:30~16:00 Break
16:00~17:30

Plenary Session 3

Australian Universities and the Graduates of TomorrowDetail

Moderator
Richard Fogarty Counsellor, Education and Science, Australian Embassy, Seoul
Speakers
Paul Johnson Vice-Chancellor, University of Western Australia
Margaret Sheil Provost, University of Melbourne
Tyrone Carlin Deputy Vice-Chancellor, University of Sydney
David Ward Vice President, Human Resources, University of New South Wales

Special Session 3

Digital Technology and the Future of Smart LearningDetail

Moderator
Sunhye Hwang President, Sookmyung Women´s University
Speakers
Larry Cooperman Associate Dean for Open Education, University of California, Irvine
Robert Gehorsam Former Executive Director, Institute of Play Inc.
Milton Chen Senior Fellow & Executive Director Emeritus, George Lucas Educational Foundation
Time Program
07:30~09:00 Registration
09:00~10:30

Track A Session 1

Track A Education Reform for the Future

Character Education Focused on Practice and ExperienceDetail

Moderator
Changwoo Jeong Professor, Seoul National University
Speakers
Yen-Hsin Chen Associate Professor, National Taichung University of Education, Taiwan
Hyemin Han Researcher, Stanford University
Discussant
Kyungwon Son Senior Researcher, Center for Education Research, Seoul National University
Sanghoon Bae Professor & Director, Center for Innovative Higher Education, Sungkyunkwan University

Track B Session 1

Track B Human Resources Management from Global Corporations

Moderator
Tae Young Kang Research Professor, Yonsei Institute of Convergence Technology

How Can Technology Leadership Enhance Global CompetitivenessDetail

Speaker
Chad Evans Executive Vice President, Council on Competitiveness

Managing Talent in Emerging MarketsDetail

Speaker
Paul Evans Shell Chaired Professor, Emeritus, INSEAD

Track C Session 1

Track C Human Resources in the Age of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Strategies for Working Overseas to Increase Youth EmploymentDetail

Moderator
Namchul Lee Director, Centor for Global Cooperation, Korea Research Institute for Vocational Education and Training(KRIVET)
Speakers
Yangok Ahn President, The Korean Federation of Teachers´ Associations
Philip Loveder Head of Research Operations & Director International, National Centre for Vocational Education Research(NCVER)
Discussants
Philippe Gnaegi Chairman, Swiss Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training(SFIVET)
Ricardo Guisado Head of International Relations, Fundacion Tripartita para la Formacion en el Empleo

Track D Session 1

Track D HR Development for the Future

Moderator
Seunghwan Kim President, Korea Foundation for the Advancement of Science and Creativity

The Slowdown of Population Growth: Key to a Sustainable FutureDetail

Speaker
Alan Weisman Author of Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth?

Can Robots Replace Workers?Detail

Speaker
Dennis Hong Professor, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles
10:30~11:00 Break
11:00~12:30

Track A Session 2

Track A Education Reform for the Future

A Dual System of Vocational Education and TrainingDetail

Moderator
Chyul-Young Jyung Professor, Seoul National University
Speakers
Grant Lovelock Branch Manager, Skills Development and Apprenticeships Policy, Australian Government Department of Education and Training
Jay Rojewski Professor of Workforce Education, University of Georgia
Discussants
Wonsup Chang Professor, Department of Education, Yonsei University
Christin Brings Senior Research Fellow, Human Resources Development Service of Korea

Track B Session 2

Track B Human Resources Management from Global Corporations

University-Industry Collaboration ― Growth Gene for a Global UniversityDetail

Moderator
Richard Davies Vice-Chancellor, Swansea University
Speakers
Vivien Jones Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Student Education, University of Leeds
Martin Halliwell Deputy Pro-Vice-Chancellor,University of Leicester
Dinah Birch Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research and Knowledge Exchange, University of Liverpool
Hai-Sui Yu Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Global Engagement, University of Nottingham
Adam Wheeler Deputy Vice-Chancellor, University of Southampton

Track C Session 2

Track C Human Resources in the Age of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Vocational Education in A Unified KoreaDetail

Moderator
Youngpyo Choi Professor Emeritus, Dongshin University
Speakers
Birgit Thomann Head of Department of Internationalization of VET/Knowledge Management, Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training(BIBB)
Bernhard Seliger Resident Representative, Korea Office, Hanns Seidel Foundation
Discussants
Ilgue Kang Senior Research Fellow, Korea Research Institute for Vocational Education and Training(KRIVET)
Youngmoo Kim Member of Board of Directors, Committee for the Democratization of North Korea/ North Korea Strategy Center

Track D Session 2

Track D HR Development for the Future

The Future Direction of Software EducationDetail

Moderator
Sang Kyun Cha Director, Big Data Institute, Seoul National University
Speakers
James Gwertzman CEO & Co-Founder, PlayFab
Yasmin Kafai Professor, University of Pennsylvania
Discussants
Jungyeon Seo Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Sogang University
Hyeoncheol Kim Professor, Korea University
Taemin Kim Principal, Sunhwa Girls´ Middle School
12:30~14:00 Luncheon
14:00~15:30

Track A Session 3

Track A Education Reform for the Future

Entrepreneurship, the Power to Change the WorldDetail

Moderator
Jinsoo Kim Professor, School of Business, Chung-Ang University
Speakers
Michael Morris James W. Walter Eminent Scholar Chair, University of Florida
Michele Orzan President, European Chamber
Discussants
Jake Schwartz CEO & Co-Founder, General Assembly
Michael Lee President, Young Entrepreneurs´ Society of Korea

Track B Session 3

Track B Human Resources Management from Global Corporations

Moderator
Daebong Kwon Professor of Education and HRD, Korea University

Creative Confidence: Designing an Engaging WorkplaceDetail

Speaker
Diana Rhoten Associate Partner, IDEO

Search Inside YourselfDetail

Speaker
Marc Lesser CEO, Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute

Track C Session 3

Track C Human Resources in the Age of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Human Resources Development Strategy in a Multicultural SocietyDetail

Moderator
Jeongtaik Lee President, APEC Study Association of Korea
Speakers
Philippe Gnaegi Chairman, Swiss Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training(SFIVET)
Andreas Schleicher Director for Education and Skills, OECD
Discussants
Philip Loveder Head of Research Operations & Director International, National Centre for Vocational Education Research(NCVER)
Jai Kwak Director, Migration and Diaspora Research Institute

Track D Session 3

Track D HR Development for the Future

Globalization, Job Market and University Education for AdultsDetail

Moderator
Youngwha Kee President, National Institute for Lifelong Education
Speakers
Merodie Hancock President, SUNY Empire State College
Vivien Jones Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Student Education, University of Leeds
Libing Wang APEID Coordinator & Senior Programme Specialist in Higher Education, UNESCO Asia and Pacific Regional Bureau for Education
15:30~16:00 Break
16:00~17:30

Track A Session 4

Track A Education Reform for the Future

Innovating University EducationDetail

Moderator
Margaret Sheil Provost, University of Melbourne
Speakers
Kenn Ross Managing Director for Asia, Minerva Project
Tae-Eog Lee Professor, Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering, KAIST
Discussant
Hae-Deok Song Professor, Department of Education, Chung-Ang University
Larry Cooperman Associate Dean for Open Education, University of California, Irvine

Track B Session 4

Track B Human Resources Management from Global Corporations

Intellectual Property Based Future Creative EntrepreneursDetail

Moderator
Peck Cho Distinguished Professor, Dongguk University
Speakers
Lorenz Kaiser Director of Research & Development Contracts and Intellectual Property Rights, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft
Jeffrey Lim Head of Campus Seoul, Google
Discussants
Jea Huh CEO, Hardware Accelerator N15
Sangwook Park CEO, DRE@M
Jun Kim Partner, K Cube Ventures

Track C Session 4

Track C Human Resources in the Age of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Lifelong Learning in an Aging SocietyDetail

Moderator
Andreas Schleicher Director for Education and Skills, OECD
Speakers
Hiromi Sasai Director, Research Department of Lifelong Learning Policy, National Institute for Educational Policy Research of Japan(NIER)
Ricardo Guisado Head of International Relations, Fundacion Tripartita para la Formacion en el Empleo
Discussants
Kisung Lee Professor, Department of Lifelong Education, Soongsil University
Meeryoung Kim Professor & Director, Institute of Aging Society, Daegu University

Track D Session 4

Track D HR Development for the Future

Moderator
Sungeun Baek President, Korean Educational Development Institute

Six Leading Edges of Innovation in Our SchoolsDetail

Speaker
Milton Chen Senior Fellow & Executive Director Emeritus, George Lucas Educational Foundation

Global Race for Scientific TalentDetail

Speaker
Michael Teitelbaum Senior Research Associate, Labor and Worklife Program, Harvard Law School
17:30~18:00 Wrap-Up

Ketnote Speech 1

Changing Society, Changing Education

As the scope of globalization is widening and technology is developing at an unprecedented rate, the society demands new skills and knowledge for diverse career trajectories and jobs that did not exist in the past. The truth calls for a paradigm shift in education in order to train the future workforce to have a clear understanding of the rapidly evolving world and to be prepared to respond to changes. Applying today’s standards and traditional education system to tomorrow’s generation seems inappropriate. Young students in school today will be joining the workforce in ten to twenty years’ time, and the world will be largely different from what it is now. Therefore, we need to propose a new direction of education, one that can guide how we educate and train leaders of tomorrow and hence strengthen national competitiveness.

Ketnote Speech 2

The Leadership Crisis: Fixing the BS of Leadership

For literally decades the world has seen books, blogs, Ted talks, executive development efforts, conferences, and similar activities?some estimates place the size of the leadership education and development budget in the U.S. at 20 billion dollars annually. Nonetheless, almost every piece of evidence?on job satisfaction, trust in leaders, employee engagement, leadership success, the efficacy of leadership development efforts?shows persistent failure and problems with leader tenures getting shorter and things getting worse. Why? And more importantly, what might organizations do to fix the ongoing crises in leadership? This lecture takes on the simplistic nostrums that have beset the leadership industry and offers evidence-based, practical suggestions for enhancing both personal and organizational success.

Plenary Session 1

Breaking Through Limitations: Strategies of Global Companies

Exchange rate and commodity price volatility along withchanging government policies around the world have made it nearly impossible for businesses to predict the future thus, plan ahead. Amid this uncertain business environment, however, the ‘breakthrough companies´ such as Google, Apple, Illumina, Tesla, Southwest Airline, SpaceX, Xiaomi and Fujifilm continue to create new growth. What is driving the success of these breakthrough companies? The answer lies in the ability to step out of the box and to see the world through reframing. Many companies tend to settle for the status quo, blinding themselves from seeing where their businesses are actually going. Companies that are ready to face new challenges and to push themselves beyond limits will lead innovation. This session will present cases of breakthrough companies that have successfully challenged their own limits through reframing and exploring creative possibilities.

Plenary Session 2

Student Mobility and the Internationalization of Higher Education

Globalization and rapid technological developmentgave usthe environment to travel, study and workin multiple different countries and cultures other than our own. Over the last decade, the number of students studying outside of their home country grew at an unprecedented rate. With the rise of student mobility, the institutions of higher education need to become more international in order to operate effectively in the global education market and to prepare graduates with new skills to succeed in this global environment.In this session, we will look into recent trends in global higher education as well as challenges and new opportunities it presents for institutions, policy makers and students.Speakers in this session will also discuss what kind of policies or practicesare undertaken by academic institutionsto attract the increasing flow of international students andhow theynurturethose high-potential talents to be competitive on a global stage.

Plenary Session 3

Australian Universities and the Graduates of Tomorrow

Rapid economic growth in the Asia-Pacific is posing new challenges and placing new demands on employers in the region. Both government and industry in the Asia-Pacific are increasingly looking for highly-adaptable and innovative graduates capable of tackling complex and far-ranging socio-economic issues, particularly around global value chains, manufacturing and services across a broad range of markets. Australia’s top universities offer graduates whose critical thinking skills, flexibility and capacity for innovation readily meet employers’ business goals and objectives. Home to the most internationalised classrooms in the world, Australia’s leading universities provide unique approaches to curriculum that focus on employer needs and boast a reputation for excellence in higher education rankings profiles. Moreover, their core research strengths align with key regional export sectors. These strengths, coupled with Australia’s special place in the Asia-Pacific region and its national commitment to developing a high standard of “Asia literacy” in all levels of education, give graduates of top Australian universities a major advantage over their competitors in pursuing successful careers in the Asia-Pacific region. In this session, leaders from some of Australia’s top ranked universities-the University of Sydney, the University of Melbourne, the University of New South Wales and the University of Western Australia-explore the strengths of Australian higher education and the factors contributing to the achievement of world-leading graduate attributes and outcomes.

Special Session 1

The 21st Century Skillset: What You Need to Succeed

In today’s dynamic economy, the skills needed to succeed in the workplace are evolving, and there is a tremendous need for talent in the technological workforce. Companies ranging from small startups to Fortune 100 corporations require a broad base of skills in subjects like web development, design, business, marketing and more. These fields are constantly changing, however, and colleges and universities are struggling to keep up. New educational models are emerging, continually updating their curriculum and the way skills are taught. General Assembly is pioneering this model of skills-based education, and co-founder and CEO Jake Schwartz is leading the way. In this session, he will discuss how skills-based education is helping people accelerate their careers and how it is allowing companies like Google, McKinsey, Spotify and more to find the talented workforce they need.

Special Session 1

Managing Innovation in China

The buzzword in the ICT industry in 2014 is the tectonic changes brought about by Chinese companies. Not only companies such as Huawei, ZTE and Lenovo but also smart-phone manufacturers including Xiaomi and OPPO are recording remarkable progresses. Moreover, three Chinese giants in web services companies BAT-short for Baidu, Alibaba, Tencent-are innovating their way out as new global leaders in the industry. This session will look into the secret of Chinese companies’ approach to innovation and explain why China has advantages for innovation both on the supply and demand sides. The talk is based on a three-year program of research conducted by the China Europe International Business School (CEIBS) Centre on China innovation.

Special Session 2

Building High Performance Organizations and Cultures

The data are clear: success does not come from mergers and consolidations to increase size, from being in high technology, from being in the “right” industry, or even from being first to market with an idea?after all, Xerox invented the first personal computer, Lipitor (from Pfizer) was the third statin drug to hit the market, Diner’s Club predated Visa (credit cards) by decades, and Amazon was at least the fourth company to begin selling books on line. Studies of companies in numerous industries ranging from automobile manufacturing to semiconductors, studies of companies in multiple industries, and research in countries including the United Kingdom, Korea, Japan, Spain, and Germany demonstrate the strong correlation between how companies manage their people and their profits, productivity, and customer and employee retention. In this session, Jeffrey Pfeffer will identify the essential elements of high performance or high-commitment work arrangements, why these practices are effective, and what this means for building management systems and organizational culture.

Special Session 2

Creating Inclusive Workplaces: A Future Growth Engine for Businesses

Deborah Gillis, President & CEO of Catalyst, will speak about the current status of women in corporate management and propose solutions for increasing inclusion in the workplace. She will share Catalyst research, best practices, and personal stories related to advancing women in business and explain why doing so is not only the right thing but also the smart thing to do, with the potential to transform businesses, families, and entire societies.

Special Session 3

Digital Technology and the Future of Smart Learning

The rapid development of digital technology and social change requires a new education method called ‘smart learning’ or ‘smart education.’‘Smart learning,’ a creative method of teaching and engaging the tech-savvy youngsters, has become the keyword for education policymakers around the world and seeks to offer a new classroom environment different from the traditional school system. In this session, we will look into how the current education system is integrating the role of technology into learning/ teaching and how this type of education will unfold in the future.

Track A Session 1

Character Education Focused on Practice and Experience

We need to foster individuals who have competent social - emotional skills, attitudes, and morality as well as intellectual abilities, which are necessary in the future society. Unfortunately, the reasons we cannot achieve the improvement of character education at the national level mainly derive from the convention merely requiring formal result reports rather than fruitful educational implementations focusing on students’ practices and experiences. Furthermore, we also lack cooperative relationships between schools, families, and communities. For these reasons, in this session, presenters will provide visions and useful ideas for the improvement of character education in Korea through introducing good examples of character education programs practiced in other countries such as the U. S. and Taiwan.

Track A Session 2

A Dual System of Vocational Education and Training

A growing number of countries, including South Korea, are expected to suffer a shortage of working-age population in the near future due to low birth rates and population aging. In response, we need a plan to effectively use the existing manpower. As part of the plan, it is being discussed to introduce a system of early employment and promote youth employment. Vocational training that fosters work skills applicable directly at the workforce and skills demanded by businesses is part of the plan to better tap into the existing manpower. Countries are looking at Switzerland and Germany as role models to improve their own education systems. Switzerland´s dual education system gives youth a choice to pursue education with apprenticeship, apart from a purely academic path. This education system is one of the contributing factors to a low youth unemployment rate of below 10 percent in Switzerland. However, even in Switzerland, there is concern, especially in the industrial sector, that academicization is growing. In this session, speakers and discussants will look into the Swiss apprenticeship system and discuss how to introduce specialized high schools to pursue an apprenticeship system, which combines education with skills training.

Track A Session 3

Entrepreneurship, the Power to Change the World

Recently, society has its focus on entrepreneurship in order to create new jobs by enhancing growth environment. In 1930, American economist Joseph A. Schumpeter declared entrepreneurship as the effort of an entrepreneur whom which that destroys the existing economic order by introducing technological innovation. Many developed countries are already making the transition from managed economies to entrepreneurial economics since the 1980s. Entrepreneurial economies put emphasis on entrepreneurship and the role of small businesses to spark economic growth and job creations, whereas managed economies focus on economies of scope and the role of industrial businesses such as conglomerates. In addition, students with higher education that have received education on entrepreneurship are more likely to start their own business. Therefore the concept of entrepreneurship is a necessity even for those who are not seeking to start their own business for individual growth. Entrepreneurship, although known as an innate trait or talent of those who make extraordinary achievements against all odds, ought to be understood as a characteristic that can be cultivated by all people through adequate training and education. In this regard, both students and adults are to benefit by learning from successful practices abroad of fostering entrepreneurship and are to discuss with experts about how the entrepreneurship education will evolve in the future.

Track A Session 4

Innovating University Education

As theindustrialized society, which highly valued efficiency, is giving way to the era of creative economy, which puts emphasis on personal characteristics, the necessity of higher educationis increasingly being called upon to foster talented people that the society truly needs. With time, the role of professors transforms from lecturers to coaches. Realistic alternatives that could reduce costs but at the same time improve the quality of higher education are also being demanded. Recently, student-centered and active learning education models using IT technologies are emerging across the world such as the implementation of ‘MOOC’ and ‘Flipped Learning’. In this session, we will look into the positive and negative effects of this new paradigm shift in university education and discuss the future direction and strategies to innovate higher education in order to foster creative human resources.

Track B Session 1

How Can Technology Leadership Enhance Global Competitiveness

Exploring characteristics of a nation with a competitive advantage in a particular industry reveals meaningful implications on corporate strategy and government policy. A systematic approach to competitiveness can offer insightful and inspirational ideas to companies while providing a framework for new thinking to governments. Such studies can also help find a way to bridge the gap between the government and private sector. Chad Evans, the Executive Vice President of Council on Competitiveness, will discuss how countries with technological leadership can gain a competitive edge in certain industries, how this can lead to global competitiveness and what the underlying patterns and implications are.

Track B Session 1

Managing Talent in Emerging Markets

Overseas expansion and global business operations became prerequisites for companies to thrive in today´s challenging business environment. With emerging markets such as China and India showing sustained growth momentum, global talent management in emerging markets is becoming ever more important. Yet, a shortage of skilled local workers and high-potential talents is a persistent problem to organizations willing to seize growth opportunities. This session will look into talent competitiveness in emerging markets and discuss how to cultivate, secure and use those talents effectively.

Track B Session 2

University-Industry Collaboration ― Growth Gene for a Global University

A Review of Business, University Collaboration (2012, Professor Sir Tim Wilson DL) was released in February 2012, a decade after the Lambert Review in 2003. The Wilson Review takes a close look through the existing eco-system that the government, university and industry have developed over the last ten years where the business-university collaboration achieved a growth in both the quantum and the quality. And this change has not only been stimulated by government funding initiatives but also by a growing realization, within both business and universities, of the central role of universities in providing high­­-level skills, a world-class research base and a culture of inquiry and innovation. This Review visits a variety of current business-university collaborative programs and projects, and provides recommendation for the next ten years to put the UK in the global leadership of the business-university collaboration. This session looks at the industrial growth strategy that UK universities are implementing with a support of the UK government and industry. Represented universities are some of best examples of the existing business-university partnerships in up-skilling of students and research and innovation. The session will provide an opportunity to share and present the strategy and approaches of UK universities toward business collaboration, as well as challenges that both UK and Korean universities may face in fulfilling business-university collaboration.

Track B Session 3

Creative Confidence: Designing an Engaging Workplace

As motivatedand committed workers are crucial to a company’s success, it is increasingly becoming a priority for companies to provide an engaging workplace where workers are encouraged to bring out their best. In this session, Diana Rhoten, the Associate Partner at IDEO, will introduce usprinciples and strategies to unleash creativity within employees and increase productivity through designing an engaging workplace.

Track B Session 3

Search Inside Yourself

After Apple’s cofounder Steve Jobs found himself laid off by his own company, he encountered meditation in India and began practicing it ever since. Google´s engineer Chade-Meng Tan shared his meditation methods with his colleagues through the emotional intelligence program after he experienced firsthand the amazing stress-relieving results of meditation. This session will provide insight into how we can effectively use our mind to enhance inner peace, self-control, motivation, and how this affects social skills and business performance in a larger framework.

Track B Session 4

Intellectual Property Based Future Creative Entrepreneurs

This session is to introduce and shed a light on the growing importance of the young generation who dream to become future creative entrepreneurs and lead the world. The role of the future creative entrepreneurs became more than essential as creativity and convergence arose as keywords in this fast changing and diversified society. Unlike typical talented youth gifted in math and science area, Future Creative Entrepreneurs can be defined as atypical, new conceptual gifted youth equipped with intellectual property mind, entrepreneurship and humanity knowledge base altogether. Regardless of diversified area of their interests and talents, future creative entrepreneurs acknowledge the differences in them and grow their potential to the fullest through collaboration and team work. In this session, how creative young leaders initiate changes and what they are preparing to change the world for the better will be deeply discussed. Essential competences sought after and what it takes to become creative leaders to become world-leading human resources will be reviewed as well.

Track C Session 1

Strategies for Working Overseas to Increase Youth Employment

Youth unemployment is unlikely to improve in the short term and there is a limit to find solutions within Korea in terms of job creation. It is time to establish fundamental measures that can strengthen the Korean economy in a low fertility and aging society rather than focusing on short term policies to reduce youth unemployment. Despite various advantages of working overseas which creates jobs for young people, the current system and programs ofworking overseas are not well organized and do not bring the expected results. To increase the employment of young people, more job opportunities abroad, not only domestic jobs, should be promoted through cultivating global leaders and reinforcing national competitiveness.As globalization is progressing at an unprecedented pace, this session seeks to explore measures that could boost youth employment through creating more job opportunities overseas.

Track C Session 2

Vocational Education in A Unified Korea

Since emancipation from Japan, the Korean peninsula has been divided for more than half a century amid military tension. It is a challenge for us to end the era of national division and open a new era of reunification. Fortunately, a unification-friendly atmosphere is being created both internally and externally. Internally, the government has reiterated a peaceful reunification, suggesting unification daebak (jackpot) theory. Also, positive discourses on Korean reunification have been made internationally. In accordance with the positive atmosphere, it is necessary for each section of the society to be equipped with appropriate policies aiming at reunification. Vocational education cannot be excluded as it will be closely related to human resource cultivation, vocational competency development and vocational stability in the process of unification or in a unified Korea. In preparation for a unified Korea, policies that can ensure social stability and national competitiveness should be established in order to build emotional and cognitive identification by developing and improving vocational skills. Thus, this session will discuss policy directions and challenges surrounding vocational education and training in the new era of unified Korea and strategies we have to prepare at this point.

Track C Session 3

Human Resources Development Strategy in A Multicultural Society

The Park Geun-Hye administration has set “tailored employment and welfare” as a national goal, under which, strategies such as“welfare tailored to different life stages” and “enhancing support for multicultural family” have been presented. The Korean society has transformed into a multicultural society with more than 1.5 million immigrants and the number is expected to continually increase. In order to assist smooth adaptation and settlement, and facilitate medium?and long-term economic activities of multicultural families, HRD emerged as a critical issue. Thus, the administration has laid out the legal foundation and suggested a new phase of multicultural family policies. However, the Korean government is facing difficulties in fully embracing various economic needs of multicultural families and changes in life stages. In this session, national strategy measures through human resources development of multicultural families in Korea will be discussed, especially in the context of decreasing fertility and labor force participation rate.

Track C Session 4

Lifelong Learning in an Aging Society

Many countries are turning into an “aging society” or have already moved into an “aged society” where the elderly population (people aged 65 and over) reaches 14% or more. The more a society is aged, the more the burden of supporting the elderly falls on the working-age population. While there was a distinct line among education, work and leisure time in the past, the traditional boundaries between them have become blurred in modern society with the influence of life extension. Despite Korea’s high speed of aging and high rate of labor force participation, there is a lack of lifelong learning opportunities including vocational competency development for the working-aged group. Being aware of this situation, the central government set theconstruction of a national lifelong learning system for the era of 100-years life expectancy as one of Korea’s national tasks in order to contribute to‘happiness for the people’ policy. This session will discuss integrated plans for harmonizing work and personal life with effective learning by sharing the best practices of lifelong learning abroad for labor participation even after retirement.

Track D Session 1

The Slowdown of Population Growth: Key to a Sustainable Future

During the past century, the numbers of humans on Earth abruptly quadrupled: the most abnormal population spurt, aside from microbial blooms, in the history of biology. Alan Weisman, author of The World Without Us and Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth?, will discuss how this happened, and why our current rate of increase?another million people every 4½ days, all requiring energy, food, and resources?undermines realistic hopes of sustainability. His talk will address how many people can safely fit on this planet without destabilizing it; how much nature we need to insure our own survival; how we might humanely bring our numbers back to a sustainable balance with the Earth without resorting to culturally unacceptable, draconian measures; and how economies might prosper without constant growth, on a planet that doesn’t grow.

Track D Session 1

Can Robots Replace Workers?

Many fear that one day robots might take over jobs from human faster than we can possibly adjust to. In a decade, computers will become something we think of as completely out of the range, a machine even more intelligent and sophisticated. Carl Benedikt Frey, an economist, and Michael Osborne, Associate Professor inMachine Learning at Oxford University estimate that about half of American jobs will disappear due to automation. Speaking at the American Enterprise Institute, Bill Gates also talked about workers being replaced by software saying “technology over time will reduce demand for jobs, particularly at the lower end of skill set. 20 years from now, labor demand for lots of skill sets will be substantially lower.”Software substitution or automation seems like an evitable future across the society and economy, including areas such as manufacturing, education, medicine, national defense, finance, law, silver industry, environment and entertainment. Dennis Hong, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at UCLA, will explain how automation will affect the labor market and how we can prepare for such future to minimize the side effects it brings upon us.

Track D Session 2

The Future Direction of Software Education

With the development of information technology, software has been leading changes in economic and social fields introducing internet of things (IoT), robots, self-driving cars, and so on. Developed countries like the U. S. and the UK make software (coding) education as compulsory to achieve software-centered society while Korea will designate and operate software education as a required course in elementary and middle schools under the National Curriculum (2015 revision). This session aims to establish policies and future directions as well as right systems of software education all over the world including Korea by discussing various insights in terms of the present situation and direction, global future talents, suggestions for international communication and cooperation.

Track D Session 3

Globalization, Job Market and University Education for Adults

Through this session, we intend to propose a new role and function for universities in order to equip them to better respond to globalization, changes in population demographics and socioeconomics changes. As a result of the growing number of older populations continuing to work later into their lives and the increasing demand for skilled laborers following enhancements in the industrial structure, the need for continuing education for adults is rising to the fore. Therefore, how will higher education institutions accept the lifelong learning demands of the times? Is it possible for universities to satisfy these demands with their existing educational methods? What types of services should be offered to support the continuing education of adults? Are professors adequately prepared to face adult students? Along with the emergence of these and other diverse issues, we will discuss the future of adult education in higher education.

Track D Session 4

Six Leading Edges of Innovation in Our Schools

Our lives today are largely different from what it used to be just ten years ago. Have our schools transformed to meet the changing needs of the society? Is our school system keeping up with the technological advancement? Dr. Milton Chen, an educational innovator who has had extensive experience in media, technology and education, answers no. If we believe that school education―the very setting for our children to learn and grow―matters, then the latest technology should be applied to classrooms as well. This session will delve deeply into the six “edges” in education that have been featured on edutopia.org: the thinking edge, curriculum edge, technological edge, time/place edge, co-teaching edge and finally youth edge or the 21st learner edge.

Track D Session 4

Global Race for Scientific Talent

In the 21st century, a nation´s competitiveness is increasingly dependent on its competitiveness in science and technology. Therefore, decisions involving how to make effective investment in this field can determine the country’s competitiveness level. In this regard, nurturing and attracting talented individuals in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) is crucial which explains why countries around the world are greatly investing their resources into securing high-quality talents. This session will look into the current global supply and demand of STEM talents, the quality of STEM workforce in advanced economies and future dynamics of demand in different regions, countries and economies.